Canadian Appeals Monitor Information and Commentary on Upcoming and Recent Appeal Court Decisions

Tag Archives: Supreme Court of Canada

Supreme Court: Conditional sentences not necessarily “serious criminality” under Immigration Act

Posted in Case Comments, Criminal, Immigration

In order to be admissible to Canada, permanent residents and foreign nationals must avoid “serious criminality” as set out in s. 36(1)(a) of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Act[1]. That section provides that “serious criminality” is evidenced by being sentenced in Canada to a term of imprisonment of more than six months, or by being convicted of an offence punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of at least 10 years.

In its October 19, 2017 decision of Tran v. Canada (Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness) the Supreme Court of Canada held that:

  1. a conditional sentence constitutes a “term
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Ivic. v. Lakovic: vicarious liability is no short-cut to compensation

Posted in Case Comments, Criminal, Employment Law

On June 2, 2017, the Ontario Court of Appeal decided, in what it described as a case of first impression, that a taxi company was not vicariously liable for a sexual assault allegedly committed by one of its employees, absent any evidence of fault on its part.

Following the Court’s review and affirmation of the leading jurisprudence on vicarious liability, it is doubtful that any car passenger service company could be found liable for the independent and wrongful criminal conduct of its drivers.

Background

The Appellant was intoxicated and feeling unwell while at a party. The Appellant’s friend ordered … Continue Reading

The SCC versus the “culture of complacency”: R. v. Cody

Posted in Case Comments, Criminal

In R v. Cody, 2017 SCC 31, the Supreme Court of Canada reiterated its earlier call for reform to the criminal justice system, criticizing a “culture of complacency” toward delays. The Court’s insistence on reform may be good news for participants in the civil justice system, too, who have seen many civil actions delayed as courts devote their limited resources to clearing their criminal dockets.… Continue Reading

The Supreme Court concludes there is no need to prove psychiatric illness to establish mental injury: Saadati v. Moorhead

Posted in Case Comments, Personal Injury

Is a Plaintiff required to prove that they suffer from a recognized psychiatric illness in order to recover for mental injury? The Supreme Court has definitively said the answer is “no” in their recent decision in Saadati v Moorhead, a case that will be critically important to anyone who regularly prosecutes or defends personal injury claims.… Continue Reading

No Place To Hide: Service In States That Are Not Signatories To The Hague Convention

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure

On February 23, 2017, the Supreme Court of Canada refused leave to appeal the Court of Appeal’s decision in Xela Enterprises Ltd. v. Castillo: a case in which the Court determined that it is acceptable to serve parties in accordance with the Rules of Civil Procedure in states that are not signatories to the Hague Convention.… Continue Reading

Edmonton East (Capilano): Standard of Review Heads South

Posted in Aboriginal, Administrative, Constitutional, Municipal

The Supreme Court of Canada released its administrative law decision in Edmonton (City) v. Edmonton East (Capilano) Shopping Centres Ltd., 2016 SCC 47 (“Edmonton East”) in late 2016.[1] The decision was one of our Top Ten Appeals of 2016. It marked a significant shift in how courts determine the standard of review for questions of law on judicial review. The result is that it will be more difficult for individuals and companies to challenge the acts and decisions of government actors, even if the government actors have stepped outside of their legislated authority.… Continue Reading

The Supreme Court of Canada (Clearly and Expressly) Affirms the Importance of Solicitor-Client and Litigation Privilege

Posted in Case Comments, Privilege

In two recent companion decisions, the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed the importance of litigation privilege and solicitor-client privilege to the Canadian legal system. In Lizotte v. Aviva Insurance Company of Canada[1] (Lizotte), the Court recognized litigation privilege as a distinct and fundamental principle of the administration of justice, while in Alberta (Information and Privacy Commissioner) v. University of Calgary[2] (Alberta (Information and Privacy Commissioner)), the Court focused on issues of solicitor-client privilege. These decisions both confirm that for the legislature to abrogate either litigation privilege or solicitor-client privilege, nothing less than clear and … Continue Reading

Business Realities v. Narrow Legalities: The Supreme Court considers the oppression remedy in Mennillo v. Intramodal Inc., 2016 SCC 51

Posted in Case Comments, Corporate Law

In Mennillo v. Intramodal Inc. 2016 SCC 51, the most recent consideration of the oppression remedy by the Supreme Court of Canada (released on November 18, 2016), the majority confirmed the oppression remedy’s equitable purpose, and held that a corporation’s failure to comply with the CBCA[1] does not, on its own, constitute oppression.

This decision, with particular applicability to small, closely held corporations, reiterated oppression remedy principles set out in the 2008 Supreme Court decision of BCE Inc. v. 1976 Debentureholders,[2] that the remedy is concerned with fairness and business realities, rather than narrow legalities.[3]… Continue Reading

Insureds Score a Big Win at the SCC

Posted in Case Comments, Contracts, Insurance

Policyholders recently won a key victory at the Supreme Court of Canada in Ledcor Construction Ltd. v. Northbridge Indemnity Insurance Co. as the Supreme Court clarified the interpretation of a standard form faulty workmanship exclusion clause common in builder’s risk policies.  The decision has wide-reaching significance to other insurance coverage disputes and to contract law generally.

The Supreme Court confirmed that only the cost to redo the faulty work is precluded from coverage by such an exclusion. Builder’s risk, or “course of construction” insurance policies seek to insure against certain defined risks which may occur during the construction process. Such … Continue Reading

R. v. Jordan – The Supreme Court of Canada Dramatically Alters the Framework Applicable to the Right to a Criminal Trial Within a Reasonable Time

Posted in Case Comments, Criminal

For decades members of the judiciary have publicly raised concerns about the swelling length and complexity of criminal cases. In October 2005, Justice Michael Moldaver, then of the Ontario Court of Appeal, stated:

Am I worried? You bet I am. Long criminal trials are a cancer on our criminal justice system and they pose a threat to its very existence. You see, ladies and gentlemen, if the criminal justice system does not enjoy the support and respect of those whom it is meant to serve; if criminal trials are seen by the public as little more than interminable games; if

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Standard of review of administrative action: coherence post-Dunsmuir?

Posted in Administrative, Case Comments

It was widely hoped that the Supreme Court of Canada decision in Dunsmuir v. New Brunswick, 2008 SCC 9 (“Dunsmuir”) would simplify the judicial review of administrative action by limiting the scope of review to two standards: reasonableness and correctness. The divided Supreme Court of Canada opinion in Commission scolaire de Laval v. Syndicat de l’enseignement de la région de Laval, 2016 SCC 8 shows that there is still a long way to go before coherence and uniformity is brought to this area of law.… Continue Reading

The SCC Monitor (19/04/2016)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Canadian Appeals Monitor

Posted in The SCC Monitor

Leaves to Appeal Granted

Since our last post, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) has granted leave in a couple significant cases that will be of interest to our readers:

Douez v. Facebook:  Like or Dislike?

The SCC recently granted leave to appeal from the judgment of the B.C. Court of Appeal in Douez v. Facebook (“Douez”), which likely garnered “dislikes” from online businesses and service providers who rely on choice of law and forum selection clauses in their Terms of Use agreements.… Continue Reading

Dunkin’ Donuts: The Supreme Court of Canada puts an end to the saga

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Franchise and Distribution

A recent article published on McCarthy Tétrault LLP’s Consumer and Retail Advisor blog may be of interest to readers of the Canadian Appeals Monitor blog. Adam Ship, Anne-Marie Naud and Helen Fotinos recently published an update to their previous discussion about the Québec Court of Appeal’s decision in Dunkin’ Brands Canada Ltd. c. Bertico inc., 2015 QCCA 624, in particular its finding of implied obligations in franchise agreements. The Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) just announced their dismissal of Dunkin’ Brands Canada Ltd.’s application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Quebec Court of Appeal. Notably, in … Continue Reading

The SCC Monitor (04/03/16)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Canadian Appeals Monitor

Posted in The SCC Monitor

Since our last post, most of the judgments and successful applications for leave decided by the Supreme Court have arisen from criminal cases. The most notable exception was the judgment in Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce v. Green, 2015 SCC 60, concerning secondary market class actions, which we have already covered in detail.

This post will cover the very brief judgment in Canadian Pacific Railway Co. v. Canada (Attorney General), 2016 SCC 1 and the successful application for leave to appeal from Urban Communications Inc. v. BCNET Networking Society, 2015 BCCA 297.… Continue Reading

The SCC Monitor (21/10/2015)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Canadian Appeals Monitor

Posted in The SCC Monitor

Since our last post, the Supreme Court has released a number of judgments and granted leave to appeal in a number of cases of interest.

In September, the Court released two of the Canadian Appeal Monitor’s “Top Ten” Appeals to Watch in 2015; the much anticipated Chevron Corporation et al. v. Yaiguaje et al. and Ontario (Energy Board) v. Ontario Power Generation Inc. et al..… Continue Reading

You Only Get to Eat What You Kill: Real Estate Brokers as Hunters and Brokerage Contracts as Hunting Licences

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Real Property

Anyone involved or interested in commercial real estate should be aware of the relatively recent decision of the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) in Société en commandite Place Mullins v Services immobiliers Diane Bisson inc, mentioned briefly in two prior blog posts, here and here. Although the Supreme Court reviewed a decision of the Quebec Court of Appeal involving a standard brokerage agreement in Quebec, the decision may arguably have wider application, including in Alberta.

In a unanimous decision authored by Wagner J. the Court explains well what constitutes an “agreement to sell” in the context of a … Continue Reading

The SCC Monitor (18/06/2015)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Canadian Appeals Monitor

Posted in Civil Procedure/Evidence, Class Actions, Health, The SCC Monitor

The Supreme Court of Canada has recently dismissed two leave applications and granted leave in one case that will be of interest to our readers. These cases touch on: case management and civil procedure in class actions (including when parent companies may be joined in an action); the standard of review and standing of administrative boards and tribunals; and interpretation of the federal Interest Act in regards to mortgage incentives and penalties.… Continue Reading

Melting Pot or Mosaic? The Ongoing Culture Shift since Hryniak

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Procedure/Evidence, Procedural Rights, Procedure

Over the past year, courts across Canada have responded to the Supreme Court of Canada’s clarion call in Hryniak v Mauldin (“Hryniak”) for a culture shift to promote access to justice including through summary judgment.[1] The latest word on this front has come from the Alberta Court of Appeal in two recent decisions which seemingly conflict on the threshold to be applied to summary judgment applications.[2] The inherent tension created by Hryniak in Alberta is that the summary judgment rule (Rule 7.3) reflects the 2006 views of the Supreme Court of Canada: that such applications should be used … Continue Reading

The SCC Monitor (19/05/2015)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Canadian Appeals Monitor

Posted in The SCC Monitor

The Supreme Court of Canada has released a number of significant decisions since our last update that are of interest to Canadian businesses and professions, addressing the level of evidence required of a material change to support a securities class action in Quebec, damages for wrongful conviction, and requirements for expert evidence.… Continue Reading

The SCC Monitor (24/04/2015)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Canadian Appeals Monitor

Posted in The SCC Monitor

Since our last post, the Supreme Court has released a number of significant decisions, including a decision about the standard of review applicable to statutory appeals and the test for civil contempt. It also dismissed two applications for leave to appeal in cases of particular interest to Canadian businesses, regarding what constitutes sufficient proof of illegal insider trading and whether Canadian courts have jurisdiction over secondary market misrepresentation class actions when the shares were purchased on a foreign exchange. Finally, it granted leave to appeal in a class actions case dealing with a provincial court’s jurisdiction over out-of-province third … Continue Reading

Screening Secondary Market Liability Actions: the Supreme Court Raises the Bar for Plaintiffs

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Securities

On April 17, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) rendered its opinion in Theratechnologies inc. v. 121851 Canada inc., 2015 SCC 18 (Theratechnologies), its first decision on the Quebec statutory secondary market liability regime adopted in 2007 pursuant to a reform of the Quebec Securities Act (QSA).  Like its sister statutes in other provinces, although the QSA regime facilitates a plaintiff’s burden, mostly by presuming that variation in market price is linked to a misinformation or omission, it also imposes an authorization process under which a claimant must establish that its action is brought in good … Continue Reading

The SCC Monitor (25/02/2015)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Canadian Appeals Monitor

Posted in The SCC Monitor

Since our last update, the Supreme Court of Canada denied leave to appeal in nine cases, heard one of the most highly anticipated appeals of the year, and released a judgment that impacts lawyers across the country.

In Canada (Attorney General) v. Federation of Law Societies of Canada the Supreme Court ended a 15 year legal battle between the federal government and the various Canadian Law Societies. At issue was whether certain anti-money laundering legislation was unconstitutional to the extent it applied to lawyers and documents in the hands of legal counsel. The majority of the court held that … Continue Reading

Appeals to Watch in 2015: The Appeals Monitor’s Top Ten

Posted in Case Previews, Features

 

 

I can’t predict the future and I don’t have respect for people who try to.
-Jackie Mason (1931-)

As part of the Appeals Monitor’s annual attempt to give lawyers something to talk about over the holidays other than the two traditional Canadian touchstones (weather and hockey), we are proud to once again this year present our top ten anticipated appeals for the new year.  Of course, we can’t control what the judges will actually do with these cases, but we think these are the ones worth watching.

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