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Tag Archives: Ontario Securities Act

Insider Trading and Tipping: the Ontario Court Of Appeal Confirms the Test for Establishing Tippee Liability

Posted in Case Comments, Securities

The Ontario Court of Appeal recently released a significant decision on the insider trading provisions of provincial securities legislation.  In Finkelstein v. Ontario Securities Commission, 2018 ONCA 61, the Court considered for the first time the insider trading and tipping scheme in the Securities Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. S. 5 (the “Act”), and particularly, the definition of a “person in a special relationship with an issuer” as it applies to successive tippees who share insider information.… Continue Reading

The Ontario Court of Appeal Confirms Scrutiny for Leave in Securities Class Actions

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Securities

At the end of 2005, Ontario legislation came into effect which enabled aggrieved shareholders to bring a statutory action for secondary market misrepresentation against issuers and their directors and officers (and others) without the requirement to establish individual reliance. In order to commence such an action, however, a shareholder must first obtain leave from the Superior Court. Much of the jurisprudence in secondary market securities class actions has been devoted to examining the standard for leave.… Continue Reading

Australian Fraudsters: Definition of Concurrent Wrongdoer Tied to Loss

Posted in Case Comments, Contracts, Criminal

When is a fraudulent and negligent tortfeasor a “concurrent wrongdoer”? In Hunt & Hunt Lawyers v. Mitchell Morgan Nominees, the High Court of Australia has clarified the definition of a concurrent wrongdoer finding that liability can be apportioned under Part 4 of the Civil Liability Act where the damage caused by one or more concurrent wrongdoers is the same. The reasoning behind the apportionment of loss made by the court is instructive on the meaning of concurrent wrongdoing with potential application to other common law regimes.

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Back to Basic: US Supreme Court to Hear Amgen and Clarify “Fraud-on-the-Market” Reliance Presumption in Class Actions

Posted in Case Previews, Class Actions, Corporate Law, Securities, Torts

The Supreme Court of the United States has announced it will hear the appeal in Amgen Inc. v. Connecticut Retirement Plans and Trust Funds, setting the stage for an important clarification of the use of the “fraud-on-the-market” reliance presumption in U.S. securities class actions. The Court first set out the presumption in its 1988 landmark decision in Basic Inc. v. Levinson, 485 U.S. 224 (1988). The Amgen decision will have an impact in Canada, where courts have grappled with the question of reliance in such cases. Generally, Canadian courts have been sceptical about importing a “fraud-on-the-market” approach, but … Continue Reading

Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun: ONCA Allows Securities Act Claims Against Foreign-Listed Issuers in Canadian Solar

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Conflict of Laws, Constitutional, Securities

In a recent judgment that is sure to become a landmark in the growing field of Canadian securities class actions, the Ontario Court of Appeal has confirmed that the statutory cause of action for secondary market misrepresentations can be asserted against issuers whose shares are listed solely on a foreign exchange.  The ruling in Abdula v. Canadian Solar opens a deep gap between the Canadian and American approaches to the extraterritorial limits of such claims, and is likely to solidify Ontario’s reputation as the new “hot spot” for securities class actions.

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OCA to Address Secondary Market Claims Against Foreign-Listed Issuers

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Securities

The Ontario Court of Appeal recently announced that it will hear arguments in Abdula v. Canadian Solar.  The appeal raises the thorny question of when issuers listed solely on foreign exchanges may be sued for secondary market misrepresentations under the Ontario Securities Act.  This marks the first time that the issue will be considered by a Canadian appellate court.

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