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Category Archives: Civil Litigation

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Do What You Say, Not Just What You Write: Subsequent Oral Amendments to Written Contracts

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Contracts

Globe Motors, Inc. & Ors v. TRW Lucas Varity Electric Steering Ltd. & Anor, [2016] EWCA Civ. 396 is the latest statement of the England and Wales Court of Appeal with respect to whether parties can make an oral amendment to a contract, notwithstanding a clause requiring any amendment to be in writing (an “anti-oral amendment” clause).… Continue Reading

Québec Court of Appeal to hear its first case on the scope of lobbying legislation

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Lobbying law

The Québec Court of Appeal recently granted leave to appeal from Directeur des poursuites criminelles et pénales c. Cliche, 2016 QCCS 1288. To our knowledge, it is the first time the Court of Appeal agrees to rule on the scope of the Québec Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Act (“LTEA”).

Cliche, a windfarm business’ executive, was charged under the LTEA for failing to register as a lobbyist after he asked municipal officials to endorse his employer’s bid to a third party’s RFP and to champion the project before environmental regulators. The endorsement was meant to demonstrate the Continue Reading

Is your Clearly Descriptive Place of Origin Mark Distinctive? Prove it!

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Trade-mark

The Federal Court of Appeal recently clarified the applicable test for challenging a trade-mark that is clearly descriptive of a good’s place of origin, pursuant to s. 12(1)(b) of the Trade-marks Act, RSC 1985, c. T-13 (the “Act”). The Court also articulated how such a trade-mark could still be ruled distinctive, and, accordingly valid: good old fashioned proof!

The context for the decision in MC Imports Inc. v. AFOD Ltd., 2016 FCA 60 [1] was a dispute between two importer-distributors of bagoong, a fish and shrimp based condiment from the Philippines.… Continue Reading

Ontario Court of Appeal Recognizes Potential Liability of the Corporate Parent of a Franchisor Under the Duty of Good Faith

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Franchise and Distribution

On May 3rd, 2016, the Court of Appeal for Ontario (the “OCA”) overturned a decision of the Ontario Superior Court which had held that a franchisor’s parent company could never be liable to a franchisee of its subsidiary for breach of the duty of good faith under the Arthur Wishart Act (the “Act”).… Continue Reading

Abuse of Process: Carbon Copy Class Actions Stayed by Courts Coast to Coast

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Class Actions, Multijurisdictional

A recent article, Abuse of Process: Carbon Copy Class Actions Stayed by Courts Coast to Coast, published on McCarthy Tétrault LLP’s Class Actions Monitor blog may be of interest to readers of the Canadian Appeals Monitor blog. Kelli McAllister recently published on update to her previous discussion about the ongoing systems access fee class action.

This unusual class action was launched in nine provinces in 2004 by the same counsel on behalf of the same plaintiffs. This class action has now been found to be an abuse of process by the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal in BCE Continue Reading

Careful Putting Your Best Foot Forward: Alberta Court of Appeal Eases Access to Summary Dismissal

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Contracts

The Alberta Court of Appeal strengthened the post-Hryniak judicial trend in favour of the summary disposition of litigation without trial by upholding the decision of a chambers judge to grant summary dismissal without strict adherence to the applicable Rules of Court.  In Pyrrha Design Inc v Plum and Posey Inc, 2016 ABCA 12, the plaintiff applied for summary judgment but failed to make its case. It saw not just its application, but its entire claim, dismissed, even though the defendant had not brought a cross-application for summary dismissal.… Continue Reading

Dunkin’ Donuts: The Supreme Court of Canada puts an end to the saga

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Franchise and Distribution

A recent article published on McCarthy Tétrault LLP’s Consumer and Retail Advisor blog may be of interest to readers of the Canadian Appeals Monitor blog. Adam Ship, Anne-Marie Naud and Helen Fotinos recently published an update to their previous discussion about the Québec Court of Appeal’s decision in Dunkin’ Brands Canada Ltd. c. Bertico inc., 2015 QCCA 624, in particular its finding of implied obligations in franchise agreements. The Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) just announced their dismissal of Dunkin’ Brands Canada Ltd.’s application for leave to appeal from the judgment of the Quebec Court of Appeal. Notably, in … Continue Reading

Cook or Get Out of the Kitchen: Legitimate Interest Required to Enforce a Restrictive Covenant

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Franchise and Distribution

MEDIchair LP v DME Medeqip Inc., 2016 ONCA 168 is a case with important implications for all franchisors and franchisees. In the decision released on February 29, 2016, the Ontario Court of Appeal struck down a non-competition covenant because the franchisor had no intention of operating a competing business within the geographical area covered by the covenant.  Overturning the lower court decision, the Court of Appeal held that a legitimate proprietary interest is necessary to enforce a restrictive covenant.… Continue Reading

The Ontario Court of Appeal Declines to Extend the Doctrine of Unconscionability into the Performance of Contracts

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Contracts

In the 14 months since the Supreme Court of Canada rendered its landmark decision in Bhasin v. Hrynew, 2014 SCC 71 [1] the general organizing principle of good faith in contract law has been applied in a very restrained manner by courts across Canada. The recent decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal in Bank of Montreal v. Javed, 2016 ONCA 49 is a further example of this trend.… Continue Reading

What’s in a Name?: BCCA Holds that a Bid Made in the Name of a Related Company is Non-Compliant

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation

The recent case of M.G. Logging & Sons Ltd. v. British Columbia (Forests, Lands & Natural Resource Operations), 2015 BCCA 526 emphasizes the strict standards required for compliance in the tendering context, highlights the benefits and drawbacks of a discretion clause, and holds that owners do not have an obligation to resolve ambiguities in non-compliant bids.… Continue Reading

Ontario Court of Appeal Dismisses Pet Valu Class Action, Clarifies the Scope of the Duty of Good Faith and Fair Dealing and Calls for Greater Judicial Restraint

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Class Actions, Franchise and Distribution

The recent decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal in 1250264 Ontario Inc. v. Pet Valu Canada Inc., 2016 ONCA 24 clarifies and narrows the scope of the duty of good faith and fair dealing imposed on franchisors under section 3 of the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure) (“AWA”) and expressly cautions against zealous judicial intervention in the framing and amendment of common issues in class action proceedings.… Continue Reading

A Tale of Two Citruses: BCCA weighs in on when an abuse of process claim is ripe for determination

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Intellectual Property

When will seeking injunctive relief against a non-party amount to abuse of process? At what stage in a proceeding should that determination be made? The British Columbia Court of Appeal addressed these questions in Tangerine Financial Products Limited Parternship v. The Reeves Family Trust, the result being that it is easier, both substantively and procedurally, for non-parties to oppose such remedies on a preliminary basis.… Continue Reading

ABCA Cements Limitation Period for Third Party Contribution Claims and Weighs in on Still Unsettled Test for Summary Dismissal

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation

There has been a longstanding dispute, or at least uncertainty, about the limitation period for third party claims for contribution in Alberta stemming back over 40 years or so, despite numerous efforts of the courts and the Alberta legislature to remedy it. The judgment in Whitecourt Power Limited Partnership v Elliott Turbomachinery Canada Inc, has ended all uncertainty, hopefully for good. This decision affects litigation of all variety and is very important as it provides firm confirmation of the limitation period for third party claims for contribution, which are common and important to many actions.… Continue Reading

You Only Get to Eat What You Kill: Real Estate Brokers as Hunters and Brokerage Contracts as Hunting Licences

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Real Property

Anyone involved or interested in commercial real estate should be aware of the relatively recent decision of the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) in Société en commandite Place Mullins v Services immobiliers Diane Bisson inc, mentioned briefly in two prior blog posts, here and here. Although the Supreme Court reviewed a decision of the Quebec Court of Appeal involving a standard brokerage agreement in Quebec, the decision may arguably have wider application, including in Alberta.

In a unanimous decision authored by Wagner J. the Court explains well what constitutes an “agreement to sell” in the context of a … Continue Reading

Liability for Opinions: Omnicare’s Lessons for Canadian Securities Lawyers

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Securities

When might a wrong opinion give rise to prospectus misrepresentation? The U.S. Supreme Court recently addressed this question in its much-anticipated decision in Omnicare, Inc. v. Laborers District Council Construction Industry Pension Fund.[1] Its answer provides a useful point of comparison and discussion for Canadian securities lawyers.… Continue Reading

More Oil for a Slippery Slope: Quebec Court of Appeal Authorizes Class Action Against the Vehicle Manufacturer KIA

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Class Actions, Manufacturing, Quebec Court of Appeal

On June 12th, in Martel c. KIA Canada inc. (2015 QCCA 1033), the Quebec Court of Appeal reversed a ruling of the Superior Court which had refused to authorize a class action against the vehicle manufacturer, KIA, for allegedly misrepresenting the frequency of servicing necessary for the proper maintenance of its vehicles. Looking for an economical vehicle, the Petitioner, Thérèse Martel, had purchased a KIA based on representations made in its official manual that servicing would be required only every 12,000 km. Having brought her vehicle in for its first inspection, however, Ms. Martel was informed by the dealer … Continue Reading

Withholding its assessment: the Federal Court of Appeal clarifies the narrow limits on judicial review in the tax context

Posted in Administrative, Civil Litigation, Constitutional

The Federal Court of Appeal has issued its decision in The Minister of National Revenue and Canada Revenue Agency v. JP Morgan Asset Management (Canada) Inc., 2013 FCA 250. The case concerns the scope of administrative law remedies and the essence of an administrative “decision.”

Background

The case arose out of a “withholding tax” assessment by the Minister of National Revenue of JP Morgan (Canada) Inc. (“JP Morgan”) for fees paid by JP Morgan to a private Hong Kong corporation, its client. JP Morgan challenged the assessment by applying to the Federal Court for judicial review. The Crown moved … Continue Reading