Canadian Appeals Monitor Information and Commentary on Upcoming and Recent Appeal Court Decisions

Tag Archives: Ontario Court of Appeal

Whose Courtroom Is It Anyway – The Latest Instalment of Groia v The Law Society of Upper Canada

Posted in Administrative, Case Comments, Charter of Rights, Constitutional, Professions

In a decision of interest to barristers, the Ontario Court of Appeal held that the Law Society of Upper Canada is entitled to deference when regulating a lawyer’s in-court conduct in Groia v The Law Society of Upper Canada, 2016 ONCA 471 (“Groia”). The Court of Appeal affirmed the Law Society’s holding that it is professional misconduct to make allegations of prosecutorial misconduct or that impugn the integrity of opposing counsel, unless the allegations are made in good faith and with a reasonable basis.


Joseph Groia defended John Felderhof against securities charges brought by the Ontario … Continue Reading

Northern Superior Appeals Dismissal of Aboriginal Consultation Claim Against Ontario

Posted in Aboriginal, Case Previews, Mining

A recent article, published on McCarthy Tétrault LLP’s Canadian ERA Perspectives blog may be of interest to readers of the Canadian Appeals Monitor blog.

Northern Superior Resources Inc. v. Ontario, now on its way to the Ontario Court of Appeal, raises the question of whether a resource company, rather than a First Nation, may bring a claim against the Crown arising out of an alleged breach of the Crown’s duty to consult Aboriginal peoples pursuant to s. 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982. Though the Court of Appeal is likely to limit its decision to the facts … Continue Reading

Certification of an “Uncommon” Class Action based on a “Central Commonality”

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions

The Ontario Court of Appeal recently reiterated several key principles in the context of class action certification motions. In Good v Toronto Police Services Board, 2016 ONCA 250 [Good], the Court of Appeal upheld the Divisional Court decision to certify the claim of Ms. Sherry Good as representative plaintiff (the “Representative Plaintiff”) in the proposed G20 class action against the Toronto Police Services Board (the “TPS”). The decision in Good reminds us of two very important considerations in class action proceedings:… Continue Reading

Cook or Get Out of the Kitchen: Legitimate Interest Required to Enforce a Restrictive Covenant

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Franchise and Distribution

MEDIchair LP v DME Medeqip Inc., 2016 ONCA 168 is a case with important implications for all franchisors and franchisees. In the decision released on February 29, 2016, the Ontario Court of Appeal struck down a non-competition covenant because the franchisor had no intention of operating a competing business within the geographical area covered by the covenant.  Overturning the lower court decision, the Court of Appeal held that a legitimate proprietary interest is necessary to enforce a restrictive covenant.… Continue Reading

The Ontario Court of Appeal Declines to Extend the Doctrine of Unconscionability into the Performance of Contracts

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Litigation, Contracts

In the 14 months since the Supreme Court of Canada rendered its landmark decision in Bhasin v. Hrynew, 2014 SCC 71 [1] the general organizing principle of good faith in contract law has been applied in a very restrained manner by courts across Canada. The recent decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal in Bank of Montreal v. Javed, 2016 ONCA 49 is a further example of this trend.… Continue Reading

Getting Around the Corporate Veil through Agency

Posted in Case Comments, Contracts

In the recent decision of 1196303 Ontario Inc v Glen Grove Suites Inc, 2015 ONCA 580, the Ontario Court of Appeal considered to what extent parties not privy to an agreement should be held liable for the obligations it creates.

In that case, 1196303 Ontario Inc. (“119”) entered into a settlement agreement with 1297475 Ontario Inc. (“129”), a shell corporation which was owned by Mrs. Sylvia Hyde. Mrs. Hyde was also the sole owner of Glen Grove Suites Inc. (“Glen Grove”), which owned valuable rental property. Mr. Edwin Hyde, who exercised de factoContinue Reading

The Ontario Court of Appeal Finds Franchise Disclosure Document Fatally Deficient

Posted in Case Comments, Franchise and Distribution

On McCarthy Tétrault LLP’s Consumer & Retail Advisor blog, Helen Fotinos, Sam Khajeei and Adam Ship recently published a helpful discussion of the Ontario Court of Appeal’s decision in 2240802 Ontario Inc. v Springdale Pizza Depot Ltd., which will be of interest to readers of the Canadian Appeals Monitor.… Continue Reading

To Comply or Not to Comply? When Experts Fall Outside the Scope of Rule 53.03

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Procedure/Evidence

On March 26, 2015, the Ontario Court of Appeal released its decision in Westerhof v. Gee Estate concurrently with its companion case McCallum v. Baker[1]. Both decisions were heard at the same time as Moore v. Getahun[2] and, together, form what has been referred to as the Expert Evidence Trilogy (“Trilogy”).

There was an exceptional degree of interest by the Ontario bar in the Trilogy, with six parties intervening in the appeals: The Advocates’ Society; The Holland Group; the Ontario Trial Lawyers Association; the Canadian Defence Lawyers Association; the Canadian Institute of Continue Reading

Court of Appeal Rules on Privilege over Regulator’s Investigation File

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions

Does privilege shield a regulator’s investigation file that has not been produced to a respondent? The Ontario Court of Appeal recently grappled with whether or not to compel a regulator to produce its investigation file of its member to plaintiffs in a class action against that member. There are important lessons in the Court’s determination that case-by-case privilege did not apply in the circumstances. Nevertheless, the Court held that plaintiffs did not need the regulator’s documents to prove their allegations in the class action, and on that basis declined to order production.… Continue Reading

Ontario Court of Appeal Confirms Privilege Over Counsel and Expert Communications

Posted in Case Comments, Civil Procedure/Evidence

A little over one year ago, the Ontario Superior Court’s decision in Moore v. Getahun sent a chill through the litigation bar in Ontario. During a medical negligence trial, the trial judge criticized an expert witness for discussing a draft expert report with counsel and required disclosure of all his drafts and notes of his communications with counsel during the course of the trial.[1] The Court of Appeal’s decision has been among the most eagerly anticipated appellate decisions of this year. The decision, released on January 29th, confirms and clarifies the law prior to the trial … Continue Reading

The Ontario Court of Appeal Confirms Scrutiny for Leave in Securities Class Actions

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Securities

At the end of 2005, Ontario legislation came into effect which enabled aggrieved shareholders to bring a statutory action for secondary market misrepresentation against issuers and their directors and officers (and others) without the requirement to establish individual reliance. In order to commence such an action, however, a shareholder must first obtain leave from the Superior Court. Much of the jurisprudence in secondary market securities class actions has been devoted to examining the standard for leave.… Continue Reading

Appeals to Watch in 2015: The Appeals Monitor’s Top Ten

Posted in Case Previews, Features



I can’t predict the future and I don’t have respect for people who try to.
-Jackie Mason (1931-)

As part of the Appeals Monitor’s annual attempt to give lawyers something to talk about over the holidays other than the two traditional Canadian touchstones (weather and hockey), we are proud to once again this year present our top ten anticipated appeals for the new year.  Of course, we can’t control what the judges will actually do with these cases, but we think these are the ones worth watching.

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Ontario Court of Appeal Clarifies Test To Be Applied At Rule 48.14 Status Hearings

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure

In Kara v. Arnold, 2014 ONCA 871, the Ontario Court of Appeal seized an opportunity to revisit its recent jurisprudence regarding status hearings and to clarify the interrelation between its recent status hearing decisions (i.e., 1196158 Ontario Inc.[1] and Faris[2]) and the line of jurisprudential authority stemming from motions to set aside registrar’s dismissals for delay (i.e. Scaini [3]) which call for an overarching “contextual approach” to determine what outcome is just in the circumstances.… Continue Reading

Apprehending Reasonable Apprehension of Bias

Three Recent Reasonable Apprehension of Bias Findings by the Ontario Court of Appeal

Posted in Case Comments

Careful observers may have noticed that the Ontario Court of Appeal has allowed three civil appeals on the basis of reasonable apprehension of bias in the last few months.  This presents an opportunity to reflect on what conduct constitutes reasonable apprehension of bias and what it means for an appeal court to make such a finding.

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Can I Sue the Federal Government? If so, in What Court and Where?

Posted in Case Comments

The forum in which to litigate is a difficult decision in any case that crosses provincial or national borders. It is even more complicated in claims against the federal government. The Federal Court has exclusive jurisdiction in some cases; in others, the Federal Court and the provincial Superior Court in which the claim “arises” have concurrent jurisdiction. Where the jurisdiction is concurrent and the plaintiff elects to sue in Superior rather than Federal Court, the question becomes: in which province does the claim “arise”?

The question is further complicated where there are multiple causes of action asserted. One claim may … Continue Reading

Dead Again: Court of Appeal makes Clear that Certification of Misclassification Overtime Class Actions Remains as Hard as Ever

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions

Last week, the Ontario Court of Appeal released its decision in Brown v. Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, upholding the Divisional Court’s decision affirming the dismissal of a certification motion in a proposed “misclassification” overtime class action (previously blogged about in the spring and fall of 2013). The appeal decision is of particular interest as “misclassification” overtime class actions (i.e. class actions alleging that an employer has misclassified employees and managers to avoid overtime pay obligations) were thought, by many observers, to have already been dealt a fatal blow by the Court in its prior decision in McCracken v. Continue Reading

Ontario Court of Appeal Turns Against Cross-Border Securities Class Actions

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Securities

The following post on the Canadian Class Actions Monitor blog may be of interest to readers of this blog: Ontario Court of Appeal Turns Against Cross-Border Securities Class Actions.

In the recent decision of Kaynes v. BP, PLC, 2014 ONCA 580, the Ontario Court of Appeal stayed a proposed secondary market securities class action on the basis of forum non conveniens.  Writing for a unanimous Court of Appeal, Sharpe J.A. found that Ontario could assume jurisdiction over claims by Canadian residents who purchased their shares on foreign exchanges.  Nevertheless, he held that Ontario should decline jurisdiction on … Continue Reading

Time to Leave: Supreme Court to Determine Securities Class Action Limitation Period

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Securities

The Supreme Court of Canada has granted leave to appeal in a case that will determine how to apply the statutory limitation period for investors in Ontario who decide to sue public issuers and their executives under the Securities  Act.  Given similar legislation in other provinces, the case will be significant for investors and public issuers across Canada.… Continue Reading

Pay Me Now: Court of Appeal Delivers Lessons on fiduciary duties, the business judgment rule, and executive compensation

Posted in Case Comments, Corporate Law, Securities

The business judgment of directors setting executive compensation was front and centre in the Ontario Court of Appeal’s recent decision in Unique Broadband Systems, Inc. (Re), 2014 ONCA 538 (UBS). Although the decision is based on unique underlying facts, it offers several important lessons on corporate governance.

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Summary Judgment on Trial: Ontario Court of Appeal Revisits the Risks of Summary Adjudication

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure

In a recent decision, Baywood Homes Partnership v. Haditaghi, 2014 ONCA 450, the Ontario Court of Appeal reiterates some of the risks of summary adjudication and reminds parties that, despite the enthusiasm for summary judgment endorsed by the Supreme Court of Canada in Hryniak v. Mauldin, 2014 SCC 7, summary judgment may not be appropriate in all cases – specifically, those in which a staged fact-finding process raises the spectre of inconsistent findings at summary judgment and at trial.

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The Importance of Borders in a Borderless World: Ontario Court Stays Action for U.S. Transportation Taxes

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Conflict of Laws, Tax

In Prince v. ACE Aviation Holdings Inc., the Ontario Court of Appeal stayed a class action based on allegations that Air Canada had improperly collected transportation taxes levied under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”). The Court’s decision highlights the difficulty in predicting the outcome of jurisdictional disputes involving e-commerce transactions. In addition, it illustrates the reluctance of our courts to permit class actions based on claims that engage the territorial sovereignty of other nations.

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Explain yourself! The Ontario Court of Appeal Reminds Us of the Importance of Reasons in Barbieri v. Mastronardi

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure


Recently, the Ontario Court of Appeal reminded us of the importance of reasons for judgment in Barbieri v. Mastronardi. A unanimous Court allowed an appeal from an order granting summary judgment to a plaintiff who sued for breach of contract and negligence, holding that the lack of sufficient reasons in the motion judge’s endorsement left the Court with no choice:

24 Given the inadequacy of the endorsement of the motion judge, we cannot conduct a meaningful review of his decision.

25 In these circumstances, we have no alternative but to grant the appeal and set aside the declaration

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Piercing the corporate veil may be easier than you think

Posted in Case Comments, Contracts, Corporate Law

How do corporate and personal liability intersect in a corporation that has only one officer, director and shareholder?  In the recent Shoppers Drug Mart v. 6470360 Canada Inc. case, the Court of Appeal helped to clarify when the person behind the corporation will be found liable.


In October 2005, Shoppers Drug Mart (“Shoppers”) contracted with Energyshop Consulting Inc. (“Energyshop”) to manage and pay its utility bills on a nationwide basis.  Michael Wayne Beamish (“Beamish”) negotiated the contract on behalf of Energyshop, which had not yet been incorporated.  Beamish later incorporated 6470360 Canada Inc. … Continue Reading