Canadian Appeals Monitor Information and Commentary on Upcoming and Recent Appeal Court Decisions

Category Archives: Procedure

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Summary Judgment: Come One, Come All

Posted in Procedural Rights, Procedure

This article by Sarit Batner, Moya Graham and Brandon Kain may be of interest to readers of this blog: Summary Judgment: Come One, Come All The Supreme Court of Canada released two decisions today that will make summary judgment more widely available to parties. The reasons in Hryniak v. Mauldin, 2014 SCC 7 and Bruno Appliance and Furniture,… → Read More

Suspension Denied: ONCA Confirms that Automatic Stay Pending Appeal does not Suspend the Limitation Period

Posted in Bankruptcy and Debt, Case Comments, Procedure

The recent decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal in msi Spergel Inc. v. I.F. Propco Holdings (Ontario) 36 Ltd., 2013 ONCA 550 (“msi Spergel”) confirms that the Court will not suspend, extend or otherwise vary the general two-year limitation period under the Limitations Act, 2002 (the “Limitations Act”) unless there is express statutory authority… → Read More

Federal Court of Appeal affirms that the Federal Court has limited jurisdiction over the province of Alberta

Posted in Administrative, Case Comments, Conflict of Laws, Constitutional, Procedure

Generally speaking, the Federal Court does not have jurisdiction over the provincial Crown. Confusion arises when the subject matter of a claim is within the realm of the Federal Court and the claim is an in personam. The recent Federal Court of Appeal decision of Canada v. Toney, 2013 FCA 217 affirms that there remain limited… → Read More

When is a Decision Final?

Posted in Administrative, Bankruptcy and Debt, Case Comments, Procedure

Introduction It is now easier for Parliament to enact legislation to override judicial decisions that it does not like. The Supreme Court has held that declaratory legislation –i.e. legislation that “clarifies” already existing legislation– can apply retroactively and can circumvent the binding directives of an appellate court. In Régie des rentes du Québec v. Canada… → Read More

Can Civil Procedure Rules Limit Inherent Jurisdiction?

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure

This was an appeal by Burton Canada Company (“Burton”) of the decision of the Chambers Judge, Justice Gregory M. Warner, dismissing Burton’s application for summary judgment. The decision of Justice Warner was upheld, and the appeal dismissed. This decision may have far-reaching implications, as the majority of the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal holds that… → Read More

Screening Secondary Market Liability Actions in Quebec: the Court of Appeal Weighs In

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Procedure, Securities

On July 17, 2013, the Quebec Court of Appeal rendered its first decision on the statutory secondary market liability regime adopted in 2007 pursuant to a reform of the Quebec Securities Act[1] (“QSA”). Although the QSA regime facilitates a plaintiff’s burden, it also imposes an authorization process under which a claimant must establish that its… → Read More

A Lawsuit Isn’t Always the Best Revenge: JCPC Rules that the Tort of Malicious Prosecution is now Available for Civil Litigants

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure, Torts

In a recent decision, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council ruled for the first time that the tort of malicious prosecution is available in the context of civil proceedings. In most jurisdictions, including Canada, the current view is that malicious prosecution is only available against the Attorney General or Crown prosecutors following criminal proceedings… → Read More

Back to Class on Class Arbitrations: What About Economic Feasibility?

Posted in Case Comments, Competition, Procedure

What happens when the parties to an arbitration agreement expressly contract out of the possibility of proceeding to a class arbitration, and this means that plaintiffs will have to incur great expense to each make proof of their claim individually, well above the amounts they may obtain as a result of their proceedings? Should a… → Read More

Government Cannot Withhold a Hidden Agenda in its Dealing with the Courts

Posted in Administrative, Case Comments, Procedure, Tax

A case recently decided by the Federal Court of Appeal reiterates the very high standard of good faith to which the Minister of National Revenue (the “Minister”) must be held when dealing with the courts in the context of an ex parte application provided by the Income Tax Act (“ITA”). For example, the Minister cannot… → Read More

Don’t Mess with Texas – The Supreme Court of the United States Reaffirms Deference to Administrative Tribunals

Posted in Administrative, Case Comments, Procedure

In City of Arlington, Texas v. Federal Communications Commission, 569 U.S. (2013), the unanimous Supreme Court of the United States clarified the limits of judicial deference to administrative tribunals’ decisions. In doing so, it reaffirmed a conceptual rift between Canadian and American jurisprudence on the issue. Background At issue in Arlington was the provision of… → Read More

Coulda, Shoulda? The SCC Expands the Abuse of Process Doctrine in Behn v. Moulton Contracting Ltd.

Posted in Aboriginal, Case Comments, Procedure

In Behn v. Moulton Contracting Ltd., 2013 SCC 26, the Supreme Court of Canada (the “Court”) expanded the doctrine of abuse of process to preclude parties which employed self-help remedies from raising as a defence various arguments which could and should have been advanced by commencing formal legal proceedings instead of taking self-help steps. Unlike… → Read More

The Second Opinion: Does Seven Minutes Matter? It Does in Marathons, Flight Schedules…and if You Are Commencing an Appeal

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in Bankruptcy and Debt, Procedure, The Second Opinion

The BC Court of Appeal  was recently invited to turn back time, by a mere 7 minutes, for the purpose of saving an appeal. At stake in Temple Consulting Group Ltd. v. Abakhan & Associates Inc., 2013 BCCA 119 was the $500,000 claim of a creditor against the bankrupt estate of Steven Friedland, a B.C…. → Read More

Interlocutory Injunctions in the Public Interest: The UK Supreme Court Considers When an Undertaking In Damages Is Required

Posted in Case Comments, Financial Services, Procedure

In a recent decision, the UK Supreme Court considered whether public authorities, acting in fulfillment of their statutory mandate, have to give an undertaking in damages when they seek an interlocutory injunction. The case arose in the context of a share sale scheme that the Financial Services Authority (“FSA”) alleged to be a fraud, involving… → Read More

Give This Post Superpriority – Supreme Court Decides Sun Indalex Finance, LLC v. United Steelworkers

Posted in Bankruptcy and Debt, Case Comments, Financial Services, Labour and Employment, Procedure

Introduction The Supreme Court has issued its much-anticipated decision in Sun Indalex Finance, LLC v. United Steelworkers. The Supreme Court has issued its much-anticipated decision in Sun Indalex Finance, LLC v. United Steelworkers (“Indalex”). The decision has significant implications for lenders, employers and pension plan administrators of Ontario-registered defined benefit (“DB”) pension plans. First, it… → Read More

UK Supreme Court Declines to Recognize Legal Advice Privilege for Accountants

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure, Tax

In a watershed ruling that is sure to have implications throughout Canada, the UK Supreme Court has held that legal advice (or “solicitor-client”) privilege does not attach to communications between accountants or other non-legal professionals and their clients. The decision in Prudential holds this to be the case even where the communications involve legal advice which the… → Read More

Top Appeals of 2013: The Appeals Monitor Looks Forward

Posted in Bankruptcy and Debt, Case Previews, Class Actions, Features, Procedure, Professions, Torts

“Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future.” – Niels Bohr (1885-1962) “Weatherman wet-fingers the sky He pokes it out, he pulls it in He don’t know why.” – Gordon Downie (1964- )   In the spirit of the season, Canadian Appeals Monitor has decided not only to look back on the key appeals of… → Read More

Third time’s the charm – The United States Supreme Court to consider the availability of class arbitration for the third time in American Express Company v. Italian Colors Restaurant

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Procedure, Torts

Introduction The United States Supreme Court has granted leave to appeal in a case that will clarify whether federal arbitration law permits the invalidation of arbitration agreements on the basis that they do not permit class arbitration.  This decision will have implications on the development of class arbitration, an emerging area of both American and… → Read More

Round and Round We Go: BCCA Declines Opportunity to Shape Leave Test in Secondary Market Class Actions

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Corporate Law, Procedure, Securities, Torts

In a decision released this month, the British Columbia Court of Appeal has declined to enter the national fray on the question of how courts should interpret statutory leave requirements adopted throughout Canada in recent securities legislation amendments.  These leave requirements impose a preliminary hurdle for plaintiffs seeking to advance statutory secondary market class action… → Read More

Do Equitable Ends Justify Expanding “Unlawful Means”? The Supreme Court of Canada Grants Leave in A.I. Enterprises Ltd. v. Bram Enterprises Ltd.

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Competition, Contracts, Insurance, Procedure, Torts

Introduction The Supreme Court has granted to leave to appeal in a case that has the potential to elucidate an area of tort law where confusion has reigned for far too long. In the words of the House of Lords, “the law in this area is a mess.” The subject that has engendered this confusion is the… → Read More

Toward an Even Playing Field: The Supreme Court of Canada to Rule on Disclosure of Amounts in Pierringer Settlements Prior to Trial

Posted in Case Comments, Construction and Real Estate, Procedure

The Supreme Court has granted leave to appeal in a case that may elucidate the scope of discovery under Nova Scotia’s “semblance of relevance” test, in addition to the scope of settlement privilege and the entitlement of non-settling parties to know the settlement amounts under a Pierringer agreement in advance of the trial.

Order in the Court? The Van Breda Trilogy – Part V – Constitutional Issues

Posted in Conflict of Laws, Constitutional, Features, Media, Procedure, Torts, Van Breda Trilogy

The constitutionalization of private international law has been one of the major projects of the Supreme Court of Canada since the decision in Morguard. However, the precise relationship between the Constitution, and the “real and substantial connection” test, has yet to be fully defined. In the Van Breda Trilogy, the Supreme Court returned to this… → Read More

Securities Commissions and the “Public Interest” at the SCC: Court to Rule on Inter-Provincial Reciprocal Orders and Limitation Periods

Posted in Administrative, Case Comments, Procedure, Securities

The Supreme Court of Canada agreed earlier this summer to hear the appeal in Patricia McLean v. Executive Director of the British Columbia Securities Commission, an interesting case that raises several legal issues relevant to provincial securities commissions and the extra-provincial reach of securities litigation. With the Court’s decision last week to dismiss the leave application in… → Read More

Supreme Court of Canada to Rule on “Preferable Procedure” Inquiry in Class Actions

Posted in Case Previews, Class Actions, Procedure

The Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) recently granted leave to appeal the Ontario Court of Appeal’s decision in AIC Limited et al. v. Dennis Fischer et al. The Fisher decision considers the important question of whether a successful OSC proceeding, resulting in the payment of $205 million in compensation to affected investor mutual funds, prohibits… → Read More