Canadian Appeals Monitor

Information and Commentary on Upcoming and Recent Appeal Court Decisions

The Ontario Court of Appeal Confirms Scrutiny for Leave in Securities Class Actions

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions, Securities
Paul DavisMiranda Lam

At the end of 2005, Ontario legislation came into effect which enabled aggrieved shareholders to bring a statutory action for secondary market misrepresentation against issuers and their directors and officers (and others) without the requirement to establish individual reliance. In order to commence such an action, however, a shareholder must first obtain leave from the Superior Court. Much of the jurisprudence in secondary market securities class actions has been devoted to examining the standard for leave.

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Canadian Appeals Monitor Finalist for Best Canadian Law Blog

Posted in Awards and Recognitions

We are pleased to share that Canadian Appeals Monitor was a finalist for Best Canadian Law Blog at this year’s Clawbies, which celebrates the best in Canadian legal blogging. We are proud of this achievement and we wish to thank our dedicated team of lawyers / bloggers who are committed to bringing you the most relevant and interesting appellate and litigation developments from across the country.

More importantly we wish to thank you, our readers, for continuing to support us and engage with our work. We hope that you will continue making the Canadian Appeals Monitor one of your sources for appellate and litigation news and analysis.

If you are a fan of our blog we encourage you to visit one of McCarthy Tétrault’s 10 other practice group blogs. You can find the list by viewing the blogroll section on the right hand side of this page.

We look forward to more great blogging in 2015. Thanks for reading!

The Second Opinion: Bad Faith Possessor … Take My Land, Please

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in Features, The Second Opinion
Martin Boodman

In Dupuy v. Gauthier 2013 QCCA 774, the Quebec Court of Appeal has confirmed that a person who possesses immovable property for 10 years can acquire ownership of it whether or not the possessor knew the property belonged to another.

In the instant case, a shed owned by the defendants, situated on their land, partially encroached on the land of the plaintiff, their neighbour. As a result of deterioration in the relations between the neighbours, the plaintiff sought and obtained in first instance an injunction to have the defendants move or demolish the shed to eliminate the encroachment. The first instance judgement rejected the defendants’ argument that they had acquired the ownership of the plaintiff’s land under the shed by acquisitive prescription through long-term possession. In particular, the first instance judgement held that the defendants could not have had the intention to possess as owners and their possession could not be unequivocal because at the time they acquired the shed and part of the land under it, they were aware that part of the shed was located on land owned by the plaintiff. In the deed under which the defendants purchased the land and shed from a seller other than the plaintiff, the seller expressly identified the encroachment. The encroachment had also been recognized in the deed under which a previous buyer had purchased the land and shed from the plaintiff.

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Appeals to Watch in 2015: The Appeals Monitor’s Top Ten

Posted in Case Previews, Features
Elder MarquesLaurie BaptisteMarie-Hélène BeaudoinPaul Davis

 

 

I can’t predict the future and I don’t have respect for people who try to.
-Jackie Mason (1931-)

As part of the Appeals Monitor’s annual attempt to give lawyers something to talk about over the holidays other than the two traditional Canadian touchstones (weather and hockey), we are proud to once again this year present our top ten anticipated appeals for the new year.  Of course, we can’t control what the judges will actually do with these cases, but we think these are the ones worth watching.

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10 Most Important Appeals of 2014

Posted in Case Comments, Features
Ryan MacIsaacBrooke MacKenzieKatie SzilagyiRenée Zatzman

The Appeals Monitor is pleased to present our annual review of the most significant appeals of the past year that can be expected to impact Canadian businesses for years to come.

In Kaynes v BP, PLC, 2014 ONCA 580 (previously discussed here), the Court of Appeal for Ontario stayed a proposed secondary market securities class action due to forum non conveniens. Although the Court held that Ontario could assume jurisdiction over claims by Canadian residents who had purchased securities on foreign exchanges, it held Ontario should nonetheless decline jurisdiction as foreign courts were “clearly more appropriate” venues.

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Ontario Court of Appeal Clarifies Test To Be Applied At Rule 48.14 Status Hearings

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure
Kosta KalogirosTrevor Courtis

In Kara v. Arnold, 2014 ONCA 871, the Ontario Court of Appeal seized an opportunity to revisit its recent jurisprudence regarding status hearings and to clarify the interrelation between its recent status hearing decisions (i.e., 1196158 Ontario Inc.[1] and Faris[2]) and the line of jurisprudential authority stemming from motions to set aside registrar’s dismissals for delay (i.e. Scaini [3]) which call for an overarching “contextual approach” to determine what outcome is just in the circumstances.

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Apprehending Reasonable Apprehension of Bias

Three Recent Reasonable Apprehension of Bias Findings by the Ontario Court of Appeal

Posted in Case Comments
Dharshini Sinnadurai

Careful observers may have noticed that the Ontario Court of Appeal has allowed three civil appeals on the basis of reasonable apprehension of bias in the last few months.  This presents an opportunity to reflect on what conduct constitutes reasonable apprehension of bias and what it means for an appeal court to make such a finding.

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The U.K. Supreme Court revisits equitable compensation in commercial transactions

Posted in Bankruptcy and Debt, Case Comments, Contracts, Corporate Law, Financial Services
Sam Rogers

Trusts are widely used in commercial transactions. But, as creatures of equity, trusts raise issues that may not be immediately familiar to everyone who relies on them in the commercial world. Indeed, the interrelationship between equitable doctrines and remedies and common law principles and remedies is complicated. Fortunately, the U.K. Supreme Court has revisited the issue in its recent decision in AIB Group (UK) Plc v. Mark Redler & Co Solicitors, [2014] UKSC 58.

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Can I Sue the Federal Government? If so, in What Court and Where?

Posted in Case Comments
Byron Shaw

The forum in which to litigate is a difficult decision in any case that crosses provincial or national borders. It is even more complicated in claims against the federal government. The Federal Court has exclusive jurisdiction in some cases; in others, the Federal Court and the provincial Superior Court in which the claim “arises” have concurrent jurisdiction. Where the jurisdiction is concurrent and the plaintiff elects to sue in Superior rather than Federal Court, the question becomes: in which province does the claim “arise”?

The question is further complicated where there are multiple causes of action asserted. One claim may be said to “arise” in one province and another claim somewhere else, even where the claims are related and stem from the same facts. The Ontario Court of Appeal’s decision in David S. LaFlamme Construction Inc. v. Canada demonstrates the jurisdictional jockeying that can result from electing to sue the federal Crown in Superior Court.

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What tangled webs we weave: The BCCA provides guidance on the tort of deceit and exclusion of liability clauses

Posted in Construction and Real Estate, Contracts, Torts
Ryan MacIsaac

The British Columbia Court of Appeal’s decision in Roy v Kretschmer, 2014 BCCA 429 provides guidance on the element of reliance in the tort of deceit. It also holds that a contractual clause limiting liability is unenforceable even where the breaching party did not commit a criminal act or egregious fraud.

This decision is of interest to Canadian businesses because it suggests that where a contract has been breached, the breaching party can be sued in tort for hiding the circumstances of the breach if the non-breaching party relies on the breaching party’s fraudulent silence or misrepresentations. Further, in such circumstances, the breaching party may not be able to rely on the protection of a limitation of liability clause.

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This Week at the SCC (21/11/2014)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in This Week at the SCC
Anthony Alexander

This was a busy week at the Court, with the release of one oral decision, and eight leave-to-appeal rulings, all likely to be of interest to Canadian businesses and professionals.

The Court granted an oral decision in British Columbia Teachers’ Federation v. British Columbia Public School Employers’ Association, 2014 SCC 70.  The SCC reversed the ruling of the BCCA on the grounds that the lower court had failed to give adequate deference to an arbitrator’s interpretation of a collective agreement, and had failed to recognize the differences between the purposes underlying pregnancy benefits and parental benefits.

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SCC Delivers Ground-Breaking Decision in Canadian Contract Law

Posted in Contracts
Brandon KainNeil Finkelstein

The Supreme Court of Canada has released a precedent-setting judgment in which it recognized, for the first time, that there is a general organizing principle of good faith in the performance of contracts throughout Canada: Bhasin v. Hrynew, 2014 SCC 71.  The Bhasin case, which was successfully argued by Neil Finkelstein and Brandon Kain of McCarthy Tétrault’s Toronto litigation group, will be very important for Canadian businesses going forward.  As a result of Bhasin, all contracts throughout Canada are now subject to a duty of, at a bare minimum, honest performance, which cannot be excluded by the terms of an agreement.  Businesses will need to carefully consider whether they are discharging this duty when performing their contracts. You can read more about the decision and its impact on McCarthy Tétrault’s website. 

The Second Opinion: “Use it or Lose it” — The BCCA Warns Parties to Act Quickly in Response to a Fundamental Breach (or Suffer the Consequences)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in Features, The Second Opinion
Anthony Alexander

A recent ruling of the British Columbia Court of Appeal, A & G Investments Inc. v. 0915630 B.C. Ltd., 2014 BCCA 425, provides a useful primer on the available mechanisms for bringing a contract to an end.  These include:

  1. the committing of a fundamental breach (leading to termination of the agreement if the breach is acted upon by the innocent party);
  2. the triggering of an express termination provision; and
  3. the acceptance by the innocent party of a repudiation (thereby causing the agreement to be rescinded).

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This Week at the SCC (31/10/2014)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in This Week at the SCC
Hovsep Afarian

The Supreme Court of Canada this week issued a judgment in one case, granted leave to appeal in one case, and denied leave to appeal in one case of interest to Canadian businesses.

In Thibodeau v. Air Canada, 2014 SCC 67, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the claims of airline passengers arising from a breach of an airline’s obligation to provide services in French under the federal Official Languages Act was precluded by the Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules for International Carriage by Air.

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Illegal Contracts Does Not Preclude Discrimination Claims

Posted in Case Comments, Contracts
Marc-Andre Russell

In Hounga v Allen, the U.K. Supreme Court addressed an issue that has not received much attention from the courts recently: the defence of illegality, also called the “ex turpi causa” doctrine. The U.K. Supreme Court had the opportunity to shed light on this defense in the context of employment discrimination towards an illegal immigrant.

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This Week at the SCC (24/10/2014)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in This Week at the SCC
Anthony Alexander

The Supreme Court this week issued a number of leave-to-appeal rulings likely to be of interest to Canadian businesses and professionals.  Four such leave-to-appeal requests were refused, and one was remanded.

The following applications were refused:

  • Leave-to-appeal from the Alberta ruling in Somji v. Wilson, 2014 ABCA 35, was dismissed.  The Court of Appeal had affirmed the striking of claims against both (i) a trial judge (who had granted default judgment against the appellants), and (ii) the respondents (who were alleged to have acted deceitfully in obtaining the default judgment). Continue Reading

What’s “New” and What to Do About it? Supreme Court Sets High Bar to Appellate Courts Exercising Discretion to Raise New Issues

Posted in Case Comments, Charter of Rights, Criminal, Procedure
Lisa Jorgensen

In R. v. Mian, the Supreme Court provided extensive comment on when an “appellate court can disrupt the adversarial system and raise a ground of appeal on its own” initiative.

The Court established a new test for the exercise of appellate courts’ discretion to raise a new issue on appeal. Appellate court judges will now ask themselves three questions when deciding whether to raise a new issue: 1) is the issue actually “new”?; 2) would failing to raise the issue “risk an injustice”?; and 3) can the new issue be raised in a way that will be fair to both parties?

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This Week at the SCC (17/10/2014)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in This Week at the SCC
Brandon Kain

The Supreme Court of Canada released one judgment this week of interest to Canadian businesses and professions.

In Imperial Oil v. Jacques, 2014 SCC 66, the Court held that a private litigant can request the disclosure of recordings of private communications from third parties to the civil action, which were intercepted by the government during a criminal investigation, without the consent of either of the communicating parties.

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The Second Opinion: “The Class Action…is Frequently Abused” — Judge Posner Provides Unvarnished Commentary on Class Proceedings

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in Features, The Second Opinion
Anthony Alexander

For the Canadian class actions defence bar — which must occasionally feel disheartened by the unwavering enthusiasm with which our courts have championed class proceedings — the recent ruling in Eubank v. Pella Corporation (7th Cir. June 2, 2014) represents a breath of fresh air from south of the border.

Judge Richard Posner, speaking for a unanimous panel of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeal, uses blunt and forthright language — alien to a Canadian ear — in acknowledging the risks to justice created by such proceedings.  He places particular emphasis on the inherent conflicts faced by plaintiffs’ class counsel.

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Dead Again: Court of Appeal makes Clear that Certification of Misclassification Overtime Class Actions Remains as Hard as Ever

Posted in Case Comments, Class Actions
Elder MarquesKosta Kalogiros

Last week, the Ontario Court of Appeal released its decision in Brown v. Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, upholding the Divisional Court’s decision affirming the dismissal of a certification motion in a proposed “misclassification” overtime class action (previously blogged about in the spring and fall of 2013). The appeal decision is of particular interest as “misclassification” overtime class actions (i.e. class actions alleging that an employer has misclassified employees and managers to avoid overtime pay obligations) were thought, by many observers, to have already been dealt a fatal blow by the Court in its prior decision in McCracken v. Canadian National Railway Company, but a recent certification decision had raised questions about whether that was right.

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This Week at the SCC (03/10/2014)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in Case Comments, This Week at the SCC
Hovsep Afarian

The Supreme Court of Canada issued a judgment in one case and denied leave to appeal in another case of interest to Canadian businesses and professions.

In Trial Lawyers Association of British Columbia v. British Columbia (Attorney General), a majority of the Court ruled that a provincial rule requiring the payment of court hearing fees, with limited exemptions, was unconstitutional, as it infringed litigants’ right to access to justice.  The majority of the Court ruled that, in order to pass constitutional muster, such fees cannot be so high as to cause litigants to “sacrifice reasonable expenses in order to bring a claim.”

In Fédération des médecins spécialistes du Québec v. Conseil pour la protection des malades, the Court refused to grant leave to appeal a decision of the Quebec Court of Appeal which had awarded moral damages to a class comprised of patients whose surgeries had been postponed as a result of employment-related protest actions taken by the Federation of Medical Specialists of Quebec against the Minister of Health and Social Services.

Preliminary Dismissal of Meritless Case: A Second Message of Encouragement from the Supreme Court

Posted in Case Comments, Procedure
Pierre-Jerome BouchardAlexandre Boulé

The Supreme Court of Canada recently released an important decision regarding the preliminary dismissal of cases, this time through the doctrine of stare decisis, which dictates that a precedent case rendered by a higher court binds a lower court’s decision.  In Attorney General of Canada v. Confédération des syndicats nationaux, 2014 SCC 49 (“CSN 2014”), Justices Lebel and Wagner, writing for a unanimous Court, confirmed that the action of the plaintiffs unions had no reasonable chance of success and should be dismissed based on stare decisis.  The Court’s decision, in a case originating from Quebec, echoes its earlier ruling in Hryniak v. Mauldin, 2014 SCC 7 (“Hryniak”)[1], promoting procedural tools which can lead to preliminary dismissal of actions.

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This Week at the SCC (26/09/2014)

A Commentary on Recent Legal Developments by the Opinions Group of McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Posted in This Week at the SCC
Anthony Alexander

The Supreme Court of Canada granted leave to appeal in one case, and refused leave in several other cases, likely to be of interest to Canadian businesses and professions.

The Court granted leave from the ruling of the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal in Lemare Lake Logging Ltd v 3L Cattle Company Ltd, 2014 SKCA 35.  That constitutional law decision had addressed the alleged operational conflict between the federal Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and the Saskatchewan Farm Security Act, regarding the appointment of a receiver.   The Court of Appeal had found the provincial enactment to be inoperative pursuant to the doctrine of federal paramountcy.

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